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 Suzanne as Kira in The Ravens

Suzanne as Kira in The Ravens

The RAVENS, by ALANA VALENTINE, AT VENUS THEATRE

As Kira, Suzanne Edgar keeps you hooked... [she] does the good-girl-bad-girl thing well enough to have you rooting for her and then despairing. Valentine laces her play with one of Shakespeare’s poems, but the drama’s strength is how clearly, especially in Edgar’s understated contradictions, it depicts this victim’s dilemma. - Nelson Pressley, The Washington Post 11.8.17

Perhaps most compelling was Suzanne Edgar, who was devastatingly convincing in her embodiment of Kira’s anger, frustration, desperation, panic, and even in her moments of humor and clarity. - Johanna Alonso, MD Theatre Guide 11.13.17

As Kira, Suzanne Edgar grabbed the essence of her character from the very beginning, blending strength and resolve with glimmers of vulnerability, anxious to stay on the right path but teetering dangerous along the edge about to fall back down in a rabbit hole of despair. - Debbie Minter Jackson, DC Theatre Scene 11.7.17


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THE VERY LAST DAYS OF THE FIRST COLORED CIRCUS, RESTORATION STAGE

When we first meet Leonora she seems the embodiment of clueless white snobbery, and Suzanne Edgar plays it to the hilt. She delivers a terrific ballad in Act One, “By the Light of the Silvery Moon,” and in a twist goes useful-liberal at the end. - John Stoltenberg, DC Metro Theater Arts 2.18.17

YOU, OR WHATEVER I CAN GET

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Suzanne Edgar brought a special and compelling charisma to her role as Victoria, a classic DC career woman who revels in the fact that she has it all together – until we find out she definitely does not. Her awkward attempts at making love with her pervy boyfriend over Skype are told through the song “The Good Stuff,” in which I laughed so hard my abs hurt. - Michael Poandl, DC Metro Theater Arts 2.16.16

Irving, Wilder, Parker, and Edgar also had a hand in creating and writing You, making their performances all the more real and organic. They are an enjoyable bunch to watch romp around, fumbling through that quarter life crisis of figuring out how to find the “You” that completes their “I.” - Kelly McCorkendale, DC Theatre Scene 2.17.16